Prof. Robert Wolkow Recognised with AVS Nanotechnology Recognition Award

November 16th, 2020

Scienta Omicron would like to join in congratulating Professor Robert Wolkow for his AVS Nanotechnology Recognition Award. Prof. Wolkow has contributed ground-breaking research in the areas of nanotechnology and atomic scale manufacturing. We are proud that Prof. Wolkow and co-workers use our LT STM in their research.

Scienta Omicron would like to join in congratulating Professor Robert Wolkow for his AVS Nanotechnology Recognition Award. Prof. Wolkow at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, has contributed ground-breaking research in the areas of nanotechnology and atomic scale manufacturing for more than 20 years and has been recognised at the AVS Conference last month.  

“This award is an acknowledgement of my work in atomic-scale studies of silicon, the tools we developed over the years to enable that, and especially for applying those to start a whole new area of electronics technology that is super-green yet more powerful,” said Prof. Wolkow. 

Some highlights of Prof. Wolkow’s career include a molecular eraser that offers better data storage for ultra-efficient computers, an atomic electronic simulator, the first atomic silicon binary logic, and the most dense, solid-state memory in history, all building on his expertise in atomic-scale manufacturing

We are proud that our LT STM supports Prof. Wolkow and co-workers’ research in these fields. This research is contributing to technologies that have application areas including sustainable energy and electronic components, fuel and solar cells, and next-generation quantum computers.  

Read more about Prof. Wolkow’s career of contributions here: https://www.ualberta.ca/science/news/2020/october/nanotechnology-avs-award.html  

See Bob's TED Talk on Atom Scale Manufacturing here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=78xUNNQv0ro  

Read more about Prof. Wolkow’s research here: https://scientaomicron.com/en/results-applications/application-notes/result/LT-STM--Atomic-scale-Rewritable-Memory-Using-Scanning-Tunnelling-Microscopy-Techniques/3553